Archive | Offline Gathering

RSS feed for this section

Drinking from the Fire Hose that is SOCAP

This week, the largest gathering of social impact entrepreneurs, nonprofits, investors and philanthropists met in San Francisco. In its seventh year, SoCap is now 2,500 strong. Normally, we’re publishing our Social Impact Update the first week of the month, but the discussion at SOCAP has been so vibrant, so optimistic, so solution oriented and so filled with […]

Girlbosses: Six Women in Our Family Step Up to Lead Our Social-Change Work

Exciting changes are happening within the Skees Family Foundation. We recently conducted a strategic plan, mission focus, and landscape analysis to help us begin to codify and specialize our evolving grantmaking strategy. This year, we’ve expanded our board of directors, welcoming 6 new women, all family members from across three generations. Here is a behind-the-scenes […]

Prosperity, Sisterhood, and Honeybees

Katherine Collins
Founder and CEO of Honeybee Capital

Two years ago, in my work as founder of Honeybee Capital, I was trying to describe investing that is truly connected to the world, to the people, to the products and entities that provide meaning and value to our communities. The language I needed was elusive. I examined terms used in the various “integrated health” indices for economies, but Gross National Happiness, while a great broadening from Gross National Product, did not quite hit the mark. Sustainability is also a wonderful term, but I was aiming to describe something even more than that. A type of investing that is regenerative and renewing, thoughtful and full of (dare I say it?) joy.

Our Young Selves: Learning, Serving and Celebrating

By Melanie Hamburger
CEO & Founder, Catalytic Women

With the new school year approaching, I’m thinking about fresh starts—for my 15-year-old daughter and for me. She and her peers seem interested in volunteering, but I wonder if it’s more about building a college résumé than offering community service. A study last year reports that the Millennial generation (roughly ages 18-29) actually volunteers and donates more than any previous one. The trick is connecting a young person to a community need that resonates, prompting a lifetime of service and an enthusiasm for giving back.